OurFuture.Energy
offshore wind turbines

Out To Sea

What is it like working in the offshore wind industry? As part of our ‘Day In The Life’ series we ask someone who trains people every day to work in that environment.

Interviewee:

Natalie Miller

Title:

Training Coordinator at Seajacks Crewing Services

Description of role:

Training people to work in the offshore wind industry

Natalie Miller
Natalie Miller

CAN YOU DESCRIBE A TYPICAL DAY IN YOUR JOB?

I’m responsible for ensuring that people who work on installing and maintaining offshore wind farms have the training they need to carry out their roles successfully. On a day-to-day basis this means I arrange full or refresher training courses for colleagues and write up reports on them.

Seajacks works in the oil and gas industries as well as offshore wind, so this brings a lot of variety to the types of training needed for all the staff. With four seagoing vessels (and a fifth one on its way) and 250 staff in total, there’s a lot of training to organise.

When we have new projects it’s always a challenge to ensure we complete the project successfully – but challenging is always fun and exciting!

Natalie Miller

HOW DID YOU GET INTO THIS LINE OF WORK?

I used to manage a business centre where Seajacks happened to be based, and I was interested in their work. I thought it would be a good opportunity to learn a lot about the offshore wind industry and was keen to be involved. Luckily a position became available and Seajacks gave me the training and development I needed to make progress in the industry.

WHAT QUALITIES DO YOU NEED FOR YOUR JOB?

There are lots of opportunities out there for all levels of personnel. Seajacks take on office juniors and new trainees, right through to people who have studied at university and have many years of experience.

Natalie Miller
Natalie Miller

WHAT’S THE BEST THING ABOUT YOUR JOB?

I really enjoy the interaction I have with the crew members – both over the phone and face to face when I’m lucky enough to visit our vessels. I also talk to different training providers across the country which is interesting. I’ve formed strong relationships and it’s a pleasure dealing with the people I work with. When we have new projects it’s always a challenge to ensure we complete the project successfully – but challenging is always fun and exciting!

DO YOU HAVE ANY ADVICE ON HOW TO GET INTO THIS WORK?

If you have the determination and drive and want to be in the industry I’d advise researching offshore wind companies and sending in a CV (a list of your qualifications and interests) with a covering letter even if they’re not actually advertising for new staff, as it shows you have initiative.

Resources Search

  • I am a teacher of

  • in

  • at Curriculum Level

  • looking for...

  • Go!

Search

SUBSCRIBE

Sign-up to enjoy updates and new resources from OurFuture.Energy.

You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking the link in the footer of our emails. Learn about our Privacy Policy.

We use Mailchimp as our marketing platform. By clicking above to subscribe, you acknowledge that your information will be transferred to Mailchimp for processing. Learn more about Mailchimp's privacy practices here.